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Show Notes

February 3

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Hour 1 Show Notes

Hour 2 Show Notes

Truckers Demanding Medical Freedom 

Rebecca Terrell – The New American

Interview

“Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau calls them a “small fringe minority” with “unacceptable views.” In a televised speech earlier this week he said they “do not represent the views of Canada.” But this double-vaxxed and boosted politician announced Thursday he is in COVID quarantine over the weekend as hundreds of thousands of Canadians descend upon the nation’s capital in protest of their government’s draconian Covid policies. Interesting timing.”

Article

Covid: Changes in Shopping Habits

Trevor WagenerComputer & Communications Industry Association 

Interview

As the pandemic enters its third year, Americans have made major changes to their shopping habits. New research is highlighting how businesses are giving consumers more choices than ever before and reveals that shoppers are not just relying on online retailers.

Article

Hour 3 Show Notes

High Energy Prices

Andrew Browning – Chief Operating Officer – Consumer Energy Alliance (CEA) 

High Energy Prices to Increase Costs for America’s Commercial and Industrial Companies by $41 Billion in 2022, CEA Analysis Finds.

Interview

Economy: Stagflation/Wall Street/Consumer Spending

Scott Garliss – Stansberry Research

Interview

Definition of Stagflation 

  • Stagflation is a period of rising inflation but falling output and rising unemployment. 
  • Stagflation is often a period of falling real incomes as wages struggle to keep up with rising prices. 
  • Stagflation is often caused by a rise in the price of commodities, such as oil. Stagflation occurred in the 1970s following the tripling in the price of oil. 
  • A degree of stagflation occurred in 2008, following the rise in the price of oil and the start of the global recession. 
  • Stagflation is difficult for policymakers. For example, the Central Bank can increase interest rates to reduce inflation or cut interest rates to reduce unemployment. But, they can’t tackle both inflation and unemployment at the same time. 

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