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Show Notes

December 29, 2021

Impossible Question

Click here for the Impossible Question.

 

Masks and Your Health

Sent in from a listener:

#2 on page 2 of the Denver order says that anyone who cannot medically tolerate a mask is exempt from wearing one. This is the same wording for Tri-County Health & Jeffco. It does not say you need any proof, like a doctor’s note, to receive the exemption. I carry a copy of the order with me highlighting the exemption and they cannot ask me what my medical condition is that exempts me. I’ve been asked twice to put on a mask and when I told them I was exempt and if they want to see the exemption, the establishment passes and allows me to enter. More people need to read the order and realize that we all are medically exempt due to oxygen deprivation, bacteria build up on the mask and mental health stability because we can’t see others faces (just my opinion – not fact-based reasons)

http://www.tchd.org/DocumentCenter/View/9821/Mask-Order-in-All-Public-Indoor-Spaces_11232021

https://www.jeffco.us/DocumentCenter/View/29819/JCPH-PHO-21-006-Requiring-Face-Coverings-in-Public-Indoor-Spaces

https://www.denvergov.org/files/assets/public/covid19/documents/public-orders/amended-pho-face-covering-order-2021228.pdf

Comments here.

Fauci and Air Travel 

Fauci: US should ‘seriously’ consider vaccine mandate for domestic air travel. Article here

New Year New You?

Matt Peale the author of Athlete in the Game of Life

Get 4 FREE online courses to jumpstart your 2022 resolutions. Click Here!

Interview here.

 

Giving Hope is Never Out of Season!

Dan Georgopulos  Hands of the Carpenter 

303-526-4488 x103 

Interview Here.

Blog Post Categories

Resolutions Good for Every Year

 Richard Battle

The following resolution principles can be selected, and complimented with specific goals. The list is comprehensive enough to cover most objectives and general enough to utilize every year.

  1. BeThankful for what I have. His Provision always exceeds my need
  2. Be Hopeful in the new year
  3. Be Fearless and Persevere to Overcome Obstacles
  4. Be a Good Example to others
  5. Be Faithful to my creator
  6. Act Honorably
  7. Forgive others who ask me to forgive them
  8. Love my neighbor as myself
  9. Endure setbacks
  10. Encourage others in the pursuit of their dreams
  11. Be Trustworthy
  12. Speak objective Truth
  13. Seek Wisdom
  14. Stand Firm through life’s storms
  15. Grow personally every day
  16. Exercise Patience with others
  17. Pray for Mercy and Rejoice in Grace
  18. Live in Peace and Good cheer
  19. Be Humble when Victorious
  20. Have Courage in my Heart to live in Joy

Interview Here

 

Why Do New Year’s Resolutions Fail? How To Make Them Stick 

Dr. Haley Perlus 

Studies show that only 8% of Americans who make a New Year’s resolution keep them all year, and 80% have failed by the start of February. Making yearly resolutions dates back 4,000 years to the ancient Babylonians. While the motivations have changed since then, the practice remains. The two most common goals that we make in the US are eating healthier and vowing to exercise. So why do these best-laid intentions often fail to come to fruition and what can people do to change that? We tapped the expertise of Haley Perlus, a sports and performance psychology Ph.D.   

Why New Year’s Resolutions Fail?  

Your mindset needs to change before you can expect different outcomes from others 

Any resolution can be a worthwhile goal, but it likely won’t come to fruition until you make changes from within to achieve it. Even when you know what you want and why you want it, we all have stories that prevent us from personal growth, make us victims to our circumstances. Until we reframe our stories, we will have trouble keeping our resolutions.  

You don’t have an accountability structure to help you sustain change 

Big changes and lofty goals do not occur like magic. Despite the struggles, challenges, and pushback, they demand sustained action towards the goal. Unwavering action is hard to achieve independently because it takes us out of our comfort zone and habits. The larger the goals, the more critical is it to have outside accountability assistance, especially as time goes by after the “honeymoon” phase of the excitement wanes and the challenges arise.  

Achieving your dream scares you and subconsciously, you sabotage them 

Your conscious self may want to achieve a goal, if your subconscious is scared, it likely won’t happen. This is what’s known as a “hidden barrier.” 

Setting Resolutions That Stick  

How often have you heard people say, “this is the year I’m going to get in shape.” When you think about it, that’s a vague statement. Does that mean the person has a number on the scale they want to hit? Do they intend to complete a marathon? Do they have a body fat percentage goal? Do they want to walk 10,000 steps a day? The point is, you need to have clearly defined goals. They also need to be goals you believe you have control over and can actually achieve.   

Track your progress 

In psychology there is a core principle: “if you can measure it, you can change it.” What this means are that measurements serve as a source of inspiration to allow you to see where you began and where you are.  Keeping track of your goals also helps you identify the successful journey along the way to achieving the end result. You also can evaluate plateaus or “glitches” in your progress and tweak your efforts. 

Don’t keep your goals a secret from everyone 

You don’t have to post your resolution on social media, but telling some trusted friends or family members could give you the support you need and hold you “accountable.” Let’s say you want to quit vaping, perhaps by sharing your goal, you might take it more seriously as others know you have set an intention to do something. Make sure you choose people you really don’t want to let down. This might be difficult, but take the challenge on to help yourself.  

Stop “all or nothing” thinking; it’s progress not perfection 

Many of us are guilty of this type of thinking. If we are dieting and eat French fries, instead of viewing it as a blip on the radar, we think, “well, there goes my diet, might as well have dessert now, and I’ll restart next Monday.” Or, “I don’t have time to work out for an hour as I intended, so what good are 20 minutes going to do?”  Often, something is better than nothing and taking baby steps toward our goals is better than taking no steps at all. People throw in the towel on one bad day or when they didn’t achieve “the full goal” intended. The secret is to keep pushing forward. 

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Date:
December 29, 2021
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